East Texas Naturalist Blog

Information and photographs mainly about nature in east Texas. Our authors have widely diverse backgrounds and write on a variety of topics.

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OH! OH! That's My Favorite! NO! That one! Favorite Photos - 2016

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Here are my personal favorite photos of 2016.

Bald Eagle Mother from last year's nesting pair

 

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If I Move - Will the Birds Follow Me?

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I recently moved my RV from a fairly good nature spot on Lake O' the Pines. I was near the northwest end of the lake and was on the edge of a remote wooded area. In addition, across the highway was another large wooded area. On my lot, I had a pretty good bird turnout year-round. Much of that due to my 9 feeders and lots of other food items that I put out for birds.

Surprisingly enough, it was not that great for waterbirds. Well, not for ducks anyway. There were Great Blue Herons, Great Egrets, an occasional Green Heron, White Pelicans during the winter, Cormorants, and Common Coots. Rarely did I see ducks of any kind, other than the Coots. Common Loons which are very common on other parts of Lake O' the Pines were never seen in this more shallow and weedy end, nor were any of the other shore birds that show up on the south end of the lake.

In the late summer, I moved just eight miles away to Lone Star Lake (Ellison Creek Reservoir). This RV park is in a more populated area. There are no woods aound this lake. The park is surrounded by houses, as is almost all of the lake. There is a little bit of a more primitive area at the north end of the lake but it is fairly small.

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Update on Freedom . . . Slow Going

So much to do this holiday season that it's been hard to find extra time, and the same goes for Beverly Grage with Wild and Free Again.  She messaged this week that Freedom is not improving as quickly as she would like, but that this is not at all unusual for a bird with suspected Avian Vacuolar Myelinopathy (AVM). 

AVM is a newly discovered disease that was first identifed in the field in 1994 when dead bald eagles were found near DeGray Lake in Arkansas. It's been confirmed that Freedom suffered a shoulder fracture that had already remodeled by the time she was rescued, but Beverly suspects that this injury occurred because of the neurological damage inflicted by AVM.  

Suspected to be caused by a cyanobacterium that attaches to an invasive species of hydrilla, AVM is in many cases fatal.  Beverly has had her hands full with an influx of other critical care birds, but promises to send photos and and updates as she can.  Can you even imagine caring for over seventy injured birds in these freezing temperatures?  Many thanks to Beverly for attempting to rehab these creatures that cannot help themselves, and we hope to be able to help her continue this mission in the new year!  

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Fighting Giant Salvinia With Weevils

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Earlier this year, a group of volunteers from the Cypress Basin chapter of the Texas Master Naturalists helped distribute weevils in an effort to combat the invasive giant salvinia on Caddo Lake.

Under the direction of Lee Eisenberg, 45 large plastic totes were filled with weevil-infested salvinia from the Morley Hudson Greenhouse, loaded onto several boats then transported to Willowson's Woodyard where they were released.

The empty totes were then filled with fresh salvinia to replenish the greenhouse supply where weevils continue to reproduce.

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Why You Should Become a Texas Master Naturalist

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If you have any interest in nature, whether it is birds, wildflowers, kayaking, nature photography, hiking, or just love to be outdoors, you should consider joining Texas Master Naturalists. 

Texas Master Naturalist describes itself as a corp of well-informed volunteers to provide outreach, and service dedicated to the beneficial management of natural resources and natural areas within their communities for the State of Texas.  

Sounds like a governmental description, doesn't it? 

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